enochliew:

Drawings by Kirill Chelushkin
Chelushkin’s unique technique manages to convey so much movement and intensity in an otherwise static medium. enochliew:

Drawings by Kirill Chelushkin
Chelushkin’s unique technique manages to convey so much movement and intensity in an otherwise static medium.

enochliew:

Drawings by Kirill Chelushkin

Chelushkin’s unique technique manages to convey so much movement and intensity in an otherwise static medium.

iamthebunny:

prostheticknowledge:

The Silva Field Guide To Birds Of A Parallel Future
Net artist Rick Silva's work combines nature and virtual 3D abstraction. His latest project features several examples of bird flight in abstracted geometric form.
Some examples embedded below:



The whole collection of works in this series can be found here

OH FUCK iamthebunny:

prostheticknowledge:

The Silva Field Guide To Birds Of A Parallel Future
Net artist Rick Silva's work combines nature and virtual 3D abstraction. His latest project features several examples of bird flight in abstracted geometric form.
Some examples embedded below:



The whole collection of works in this series can be found here

OH FUCK iamthebunny:

prostheticknowledge:

The Silva Field Guide To Birds Of A Parallel Future
Net artist Rick Silva's work combines nature and virtual 3D abstraction. His latest project features several examples of bird flight in abstracted geometric form.
Some examples embedded below:



The whole collection of works in this series can be found here

OH FUCK iamthebunny:

prostheticknowledge:

The Silva Field Guide To Birds Of A Parallel Future
Net artist Rick Silva's work combines nature and virtual 3D abstraction. His latest project features several examples of bird flight in abstracted geometric form.
Some examples embedded below:



The whole collection of works in this series can be found here

OH FUCK iamthebunny:

prostheticknowledge:

The Silva Field Guide To Birds Of A Parallel Future
Net artist Rick Silva's work combines nature and virtual 3D abstraction. His latest project features several examples of bird flight in abstracted geometric form.
Some examples embedded below:



The whole collection of works in this series can be found here

OH FUCK

iamthebunny:

prostheticknowledge:

The Silva Field Guide To Birds Of A Parallel Future

Net artist Rick Silva's work combines nature and virtual 3D abstraction. His latest project features several examples of bird flight in abstracted geometric form.

Some examples embedded below:

The whole collection of works in this series can be found here

OH FUCK

Wot Selphie

  • Me: I've been thinking about this a lot lately .
  • Other Me: Thinking is a good thing--
  • Me: Of course it is. No real person would argue that.
  • Other Me: Get on with it, then.
  • Me: Fine, I will. My job drains from me the motivation that I believe is needed for me to peruse my creative outlets.
  • Other Me: So quit your fucking job!
  • Me: I don't want to. I actually like my job. I'm just saying that I need a collaborative creative project I can work on. We don't have to reinvent the wheel, here. I just want to create art with other people, with a common goal. I need that in my life right now, because sometimes I go crazy needing this kind of outlet.
  • Other Me: Well, the fuck you want me to do about it?
  • Me: How about you go fuck yourself. I'll just keep looking for creative people who want to make something with me. I want to start a band with 4 completely different people. I want to make animated short films, then score them. I want a partner for a two man act, during which we will punch ghosts on stage in front of tens of people.
  • Other Me: your a loser. Nerd!
  • Me: It's "you're."

tegansenpai:

timetravellingtimelord:

theparadoxymoron:

katiefab:

cutebabe:

shipcomingthrough:

Just watch it.

oh……my fucking

No, seriously. Watch the video.

but guys…can you imagine what would happen if someone hacked the highways? 

HERE’S THE LINK TO SOLAR FREAKIN’ ROADWAYS GUYS

image

SIGNAL BOOST THIS SHIT

(via crookednoise)

explore-blog:

Zen Pencils adapts Stanley Kubrick's fantastic 1968 Playboy interview on mortality and the meaning of life in a comic.

Also see Bukowski on the myths of creativity in a comic.

(via kadrey)

sixpenceee:

Déjà Vu
Déjà vu is the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself. 
The experience is usually accompanied by a strong sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness, strangeness, or weirdness. The “previous” experience is usually attributed to a dream, but sometimes there is a firm sense that it has truly occurred in the past.
Déjà Vécu
Déjà vécu is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu. 
Déjà vu is the sense of having seen something before, whereas déjà vécu is the experience of having seen an event before, but in great detail – such as recognizing smells and sounds. 
Déjà Visité
Déjà visité is a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. For example, you may know your way around a a new town or a landscape despite having never been there, and knowing that it is impossible for you to have this knowledge. 
Déjà Senti
Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. This is exclusively a mental phenomenon and seldom remains in your memory afterwards.
You could think of it as the feeling of having just spoken, but realizing that you, in fact, didn’t utter a word.
Jamais Vu
Jamais vu (never seen) describes a familiar situation which is not recognized. It is often considered to be the opposite of déjà vu and it involves a sense of eeriness. The observer does not recognize the situation despite knowing rationally that they have been there before.
Chris Moulin, of Leeds University, asked 92 volunteers to write out “door” 30 times in 60 seconds. He reported that 68% of the precipitants showed symptoms of jamais vu, such as beginning to doubt that “door” was a real word. This has lead him to believe that jamais vu may be a symptom of brain fatigue.
Presque Vu
Presque vu is very similar to the “tip of the tongue” sensation – it is the strong feeling that you are about to experience an epiphany – though the epiphany seldom comes. 
L’esprit de l’Escalier
L’esprit de l’escalier (stairway wit) is the sense of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late. 
Capgras Delusion
Capgras delusion is the phenomenon in which a person believes that a close friend or family member has been replaced by an identical looking impostor. This could be tied in to the old belief that babies were stolen and replaced by changelings in medieval folklore, as well as the modern idea of aliens taking over the bodies of people on earth to live amongst us for reasons unknown. This delusion is most common in people with schizophrenia but it can occur in other disorders.
Fregoli Delusion
Fregoli delusion is a rare brain phenomenon in which a person holds the belief that different people are, in fact, the same person in a variety of disguises. It is often associated with paranoia and the belief that the person in disguise is trying to persecute them.
It was first reported in 1927 in the case study of a 27-year-old woman who believed she was being persecuted by two actors whom she often went to see at the theatre. She believed that these people “pursued her closely, taking the form of people she knows or meets”.
Prosopagnosia
Prosopagnosia is a phenomenon in which a person is unable to recognize faces of people or objects that they should know. People experiencing this disorder are usually able to use their other senses to recognize people – such as a person’s perfume, the shape or style of their hair, the sound of their voice, or even their gait. A classic case of this disorder was presented in the 1998 book (and later Opera by Michael Nyman) called “The man who mistook his wife for a hat”.
SOURCE
sixpenceee:

Déjà Vu
Déjà vu is the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself. 
The experience is usually accompanied by a strong sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness, strangeness, or weirdness. The “previous” experience is usually attributed to a dream, but sometimes there is a firm sense that it has truly occurred in the past.
Déjà Vécu
Déjà vécu is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu. 
Déjà vu is the sense of having seen something before, whereas déjà vécu is the experience of having seen an event before, but in great detail – such as recognizing smells and sounds. 
Déjà Visité
Déjà visité is a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. For example, you may know your way around a a new town or a landscape despite having never been there, and knowing that it is impossible for you to have this knowledge. 
Déjà Senti
Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. This is exclusively a mental phenomenon and seldom remains in your memory afterwards.
You could think of it as the feeling of having just spoken, but realizing that you, in fact, didn’t utter a word.
Jamais Vu
Jamais vu (never seen) describes a familiar situation which is not recognized. It is often considered to be the opposite of déjà vu and it involves a sense of eeriness. The observer does not recognize the situation despite knowing rationally that they have been there before.
Chris Moulin, of Leeds University, asked 92 volunteers to write out “door” 30 times in 60 seconds. He reported that 68% of the precipitants showed symptoms of jamais vu, such as beginning to doubt that “door” was a real word. This has lead him to believe that jamais vu may be a symptom of brain fatigue.
Presque Vu
Presque vu is very similar to the “tip of the tongue” sensation – it is the strong feeling that you are about to experience an epiphany – though the epiphany seldom comes. 
L’esprit de l’Escalier
L’esprit de l’escalier (stairway wit) is the sense of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late. 
Capgras Delusion
Capgras delusion is the phenomenon in which a person believes that a close friend or family member has been replaced by an identical looking impostor. This could be tied in to the old belief that babies were stolen and replaced by changelings in medieval folklore, as well as the modern idea of aliens taking over the bodies of people on earth to live amongst us for reasons unknown. This delusion is most common in people with schizophrenia but it can occur in other disorders.
Fregoli Delusion
Fregoli delusion is a rare brain phenomenon in which a person holds the belief that different people are, in fact, the same person in a variety of disguises. It is often associated with paranoia and the belief that the person in disguise is trying to persecute them.
It was first reported in 1927 in the case study of a 27-year-old woman who believed she was being persecuted by two actors whom she often went to see at the theatre. She believed that these people “pursued her closely, taking the form of people she knows or meets”.
Prosopagnosia
Prosopagnosia is a phenomenon in which a person is unable to recognize faces of people or objects that they should know. People experiencing this disorder are usually able to use their other senses to recognize people – such as a person’s perfume, the shape or style of their hair, the sound of their voice, or even their gait. A classic case of this disorder was presented in the 1998 book (and later Opera by Michael Nyman) called “The man who mistook his wife for a hat”.
SOURCE

sixpenceee:

Déjà Vu

Déjà vu is the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself.

The experience is usually accompanied by a strong sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness, strangeness, or weirdness. The “previous” experience is usually attributed to a dream, but sometimes there is a firm sense that it has truly occurred in the past.

Déjà Vécu

Déjà vécu is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu.

Déjà vu is the sense of having seen something before, whereas déjà vécu is the experience of having seen an event before, but in great detail – such as recognizing smells and sounds. 

Déjà Visité

Déjà visité is a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. For example, you may know your way around a a new town or a landscape despite having never been there, and knowing that it is impossible for you to have this knowledge. 

Déjà Senti

Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. This is exclusively a mental phenomenon and seldom remains in your memory afterwards.

You could think of it as the feeling of having just spoken, but realizing that you, in fact, didn’t utter a word.

Jamais Vu

Jamais vu (never seen) describes a familiar situation which is not recognized. It is often considered to be the opposite of déjà vu and it involves a sense of eeriness. The observer does not recognize the situation despite knowing rationally that they have been there before.

Chris Moulin, of Leeds University, asked 92 volunteers to write out “door” 30 times in 60 seconds. He reported that 68% of the precipitants showed symptoms of jamais vu, such as beginning to doubt that “door” was a real word. This has lead him to believe that jamais vu may be a symptom of brain fatigue.

Presque Vu

Presque vu is very similar to the “tip of the tongue” sensation – it is the strong feeling that you are about to experience an epiphany – though the epiphany seldom comes. 

L’esprit de l’Escalier

L’esprit de l’escalier (stairway wit) is the sense of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late. 

Capgras Delusion

Capgras delusion is the phenomenon in which a person believes that a close friend or family member has been replaced by an identical looking impostor. This could be tied in to the old belief that babies were stolen and replaced by changelings in medieval folklore, as well as the modern idea of aliens taking over the bodies of people on earth to live amongst us for reasons unknown. This delusion is most common in people with schizophrenia but it can occur in other disorders.

Fregoli Delusion

Fregoli delusion is a rare brain phenomenon in which a person holds the belief that different people are, in fact, the same person in a variety of disguises. It is often associated with paranoia and the belief that the person in disguise is trying to persecute them.

It was first reported in 1927 in the case study of a 27-year-old woman who believed she was being persecuted by two actors whom she often went to see at the theatre. She believed that these people “pursued her closely, taking the form of people she knows or meets”.

Prosopagnosia

Prosopagnosia is a phenomenon in which a person is unable to recognize faces of people or objects that they should know. People experiencing this disorder are usually able to use their other senses to recognize people – such as a person’s perfume, the shape or style of their hair, the sound of their voice, or even their gait. A classic case of this disorder was presented in the 1998 book (and later Opera by Michael Nyman) called “The man who mistook his wife for a hat”.

SOURCE

(via kadrey)

gr-comics:

brianmichaelbendis:

Vania Zouravliov

Wow gr-comics:

brianmichaelbendis:

Vania Zouravliov

Wow gr-comics:

brianmichaelbendis:

Vania Zouravliov

Wow gr-comics:

brianmichaelbendis:

Vania Zouravliov

Wow gr-comics:

brianmichaelbendis:

Vania Zouravliov

Wow gr-comics:

brianmichaelbendis:

Vania Zouravliov

Wow

bio-noir:

Skullfucker by Warwick Fraser-Coombe via deviant art

(via iamthebunny)

meganamram:

If you forgot to write your mom a Mother’s Day letter, use this template for a last minute quick-fix! (And preorder her my book “SCIENCE…FOR HER!” at Amazon and Barnes & Noble and Indiebound!)

Dear [pet name for “mother”],

It’s me, [your name]. You know, your [numerical ranking]-favorite child. I just want to wish you a